The dream of "Yellow Dogs" Iranian murdered in Brooklyn

 

They fled Iran to go after their dream rock. Invited in 2010 by the SXSW festival in Texas, the Soroush and Arash Farazmand (guitarist and drummer respectively) brothers had decided not to return home. The musicians had sought asylum in the United States and began to make a name in the grunge bars in Brooklyn.

In Iran, where rock is an "illegal activity" deemed contrary to religion, Yellow Dogs [Yellow Dog Ed] occurred in garages and basements for underground concerts . But the United States, post-punk their sound weird and exotic words were warmly welcomed. Prominently in Rolling Stone, they were invited to play all over the country with the other two members of their group: Siavash Karampour singer and bassist Koory Mirz. There are three weeks, the entire group produced the famous Brooklyn Bowl. On its website, the club described the Yellow Dogs as a "roaring life, spirit, tension and imagination" group.

Monday, November 11th in the morning, the two brothers were found dead, shot to death, along with their roommate and Iranian musician and songwriter Ali Eskandarian, 35. Their killer, Ali Akbar Mohammadi Rafie, a former member of another Iranian group, the Free Keys, has committed suicide shortly after the incident.

Shot dead in their apartment

According to the spokesman for the police, John J. McCarthy, interviewed by the New York Times, Rafie accessed the apartment through the roof. He had placed his gun in a guitar case. It was first shot Ali Eskandarian through a lounge window. Then in the chest Soroush, 27, who was lying in bed. Then came the turn of Arash, 28, shot in the head while he was on his computer.

Another resident of the apartment, the Iranian street-artist Sasan Sadeghpourosko, was shot twice in the shoulder and elbow, but survived. Rafie smashed the door of another apartment in the building, finding himself born in born with Pooya Hosseini, also a musician. The latter fought with him and escaped unharmed. Rafie is then returned to the roof of the building where he was shot in the head.

Salehezadeh Ali, who was the manager of the group and lived in the same block, told Reuters they had cut off contact with Rafie after he e , ty excluded Free Keys for stealing money. "When he was fired from his own group, we almost severed all ties with him. We were not really friends with him, "said Ali Salehezadeh in a telephone interview from Brazil. Himself had trouble finding a possible motive for the killings. "I do not know if it is right for them, for us, or for revenge because a member of the Free Keys live with us."

"Good boys"

Bassist and singer Koory Mirz Siavash Karampour were not there at the time of the attack. Monday, they posted a message on the group's Facebook page to announce the news, thanking their fans for the many messages of condolence still kept coming Tuesday.

Brian Kiernan Devine Jr., a member of a film crew who made a documentary about the group, said he was "shattered" by the news. "This is the youth group of the warmest, sincere and idealistic we had the chance to know artists. They managed to escape from Iran, were granted political asylum in New York to pursue their creative dreams (…) All this to be slaughtered in their beds. It is incomprehensible. This is madness. "

Yanira Lantigua, cashier of a local grocery store where young people would do their errands, calls "lovely and quiet boys who have never had a cross word." Monday, around 1 am, she heard the police helicopters flying over the area. It made him a shock to learn that she knew the victims. "They came to buy sandwiches and coffee as recently as a few days ago," she tells FRANCE 24. "The brothers were inseparable. They were really good boys. "

Alireza Tabiban an Iranian expatriate based in Austin, Texas, who had met and had seen them twice in concert, describes them as "very cool boys who just wanted to play their music and have fun. "He added that his family and friends in Tehran would be horrified by the details of this story. "There are not many murders by firearms [in Iran], since it is illegal to possess weapons," he told FRANCE 24. Mehdi Saharkhiz, an Observer FRANCE 24 who met the group in 2010 and spoke of them with passion, tweeted Monday: "This is hell. I still can not believe it. "

Slaughtered on the rise

The Yellow Dogs had built a solid fan club in the United States and beyond. The last member of the group to be granted asylum in the United States had received his papers there are only a few months. The rockers were planning a tour of Europe and Turkey, where they hoped to happen to their family and friends. "Our parents have never seen us play!" Confided Soroush Farazmand in April 2012 in an interview with eMusic.

Before leaving Iran, the group formed in 2006 in Tehran appeared in a documentary about the underground music scene of the Iranian capital, "Persian Cats". The film won the Special Jury Prize at Cannes in 2009. That same year, in a CNN report, Siavash Karampour judged its affiliates as "closer than [his] brothers."

In the last interview that Soroush Farazmand gave before being killed, he explained to Vice magazine: "We have decided to live in Brooklyn because it's a place where we can grow. "Their apartment 318 East Williamsburg became a gathering place for artists and Iranian musicians.

"It was a small group of punk underground from Iran who was turning heads," explains Ali Salehezadeh their manager in an interview with Reuters. "They always said, 'If you want to get there, we must do so in New York,'" he relates. "But they have not been so lucky."

Adapted by Steven Jambot in Paris.

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